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Wednesday, September 8, 2010

One Love Two Colours: The Unlikely Marriage of a Punk Rocker and His African Queen



Written By: Nicole Parker- Jones—One Love Two Colours: The Unlikely Marriage of a Punk Rocker and His African Queen is a true story about love and marriage told from the viewpoint of a Nigerian woman (Margaret Oshindele-Smith) and an English man (Bobby Smith). It is also a book about race, relationships and identity.

Co-author Bobby Smith shares about his and his wife's labor of love:
One Love looks at the true life marriage between myself (an English, working class punk rocker) and Margaret (a middle class, Nigerian Methodist). We have been married for 10 years and the book shows how a succesful interracial marriage can be achieved. It shirks no issues, ranging from: racism, identity, colour-grading, sex, food and religion. You might be interested to know that our motivation for writing this book was to show interracial marriages in a positive light, as they are normally seen as impossible dreams, doomed to failure. We also wanted to write a book specifically about the black woman/white man experience, as most books on interracial relationships come from the other side of the hill. If nothing else we can guarantee the reader a 100 per cent honest book with humour never far away from our story. Enjoy!
If you're interested in reading the book, visit Google Reader, which has a preview of the book.

7 comments:

Myne Whitman said...

Is that a real picture of them? SMH...

Anonymous said...

Hmm, not sure about this book. This looks like all sorts of stereotypes starting with the title, why does she have to be an "African Queen" whereas he's just some "Punk Rocker." #PASS

MIMI Reader said...

This book is supposed to be about confronting stereotypes and then the cover itself is a stereotypical representation of an African woman. Now I'm not saying that there are no African women who dress exactly like that, but I'm a little skeptical in this case.

Anonymous said...

not clear because the title itself is conflicting, not to mention the depicted illustration. That maami tammi look is not african but a picture of poor health. What exactly is this book going to address that experience has not or will not stamp in our minds? just another gimick, i'll pass. Esi, MD

Anonymous said...

Since it's free on google reader, I will read a bit before judging but under any other circumstance I would pass on this book. I would have rather heard a comment from the wife rather than the husband, just saying.

Myne Whitman said...

I have read excerpts of the book on google and I have to say I've changed my mind. The picture and title are stereotypical but it basically describes them. I don't know why they have to pigeonhole themselves, the lady admits to being more Yoruba than Nigerian or African. Anyway, it is well written and though there are generalizations, they admit their bias. Good luck to them on the book and happy marriage.

Anonymous said...

Well, maybe this is a case of "can't judge a book by its cover" LITERALLY.